Overground Railroad The Green Book and the Roots of Black Travel in America
Overground Railroad
The Green Book and the Roots of Black Travel in America
  • Imprint: Abrams Press
  • Publication Date: January 7, 2020
  • Price: $26.43
  • ISBN: 978-1-68335-657-8
  • EAN: 9781683356578
  • Page Count: 360
  • Illustrations: 200 color and black-and-white illustrations
  • Format: Ebook
  • Rights: World English
  • Additional formats:

The first book to explore the historical role and residual impact of the Green Book, a travel guide for black motorists

Published from 1936 to 1966, the Green Book was hailed as the “black travel guide to America.” At that time, it was very dangerous and difficult for African-Americans to travel because black travelers couldn’t eat, sleep, or buy gas at most white-owned businesses. The Green Book listed hotels, restaurants, gas stations, and other businesses that were safe for black travelers. It was a resourceful and innovative solution to a horrific problem. It took courage to be listed in the Green Book, and Overground Railroad celebrates the stories of those who put their names in the book and stood up against segregation. It shows the history of the Green Book, how we arrived at our present historical moment, and how far we still have to go when it comes to race relations in America.

Praise

“In scope and tone, “Overground Railroad” recalls Isabel Wilkerson’s “The Warmth of Other Suns…At its center, the book is a nuanced commentary of how black bodies have been monitored, censured or violated, and it compellingly pulls readers into the current news cycle.”
The Los Angeles Times
"A fascinating look at a groundbreaking guide."
The New York Post
“The overarching story of the Green Book reminds us that individual acts of bravery contributed immeasurably to standing up to segregation.”
The Daily Beast
“…her book is a moving and needed history. The overt white nationalism of our era highlights the covert racism that never went away.”
Bookforum
"An enriching look at African American history through the lens of the black motorist, and as one of the few books on the subject, this is essential for most collections."
Library Journal, STARRED REVIEW
“Overground Railroad is an eye-opening, deeply moving social history of American segregation and black migration during the middle years of the 20th century.”
BookPage, STARRED review

About the author

Candacy Taylor is an award-winning author, photographer and cultural documentarian. Her work has been featured in over 50 media outlets including the New Yorker and The Atlantic. She is the recipient of numerous fellowships and grants including The Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard University and the National Endowment for the Humanities. She lives in Denver, Colorado.